Science, Society & Self
How our scientific beliefs form our self and our world

— A 3 day workshop or a full semester course — 

© Copyright 2002 – 2017 John Bickart.
This material may be copied for educational purposes.

Course Description
Conceptual Overview
Course Objectives
Guiding Questions
High Level Topic Outline
Chronology
Detail Outline

Course Description

This course is designed for:
– science literacy since globalization has brought about a demand for social awareness,
– the humanist who needs to relate hard science to the social sciences of Literature, History, and Psychology,
– the artist and poet in all of us.

What does science have to do with society?
From 1970 to 2004 the U.S. had a 30% increase in writers where 240 universities have established creative writing MFA programs, up from fewer than twenty. Recently, Harvard admitted 10% of their MBA applicants, while UCLA admitted 3% MFA applicants. MFAs are the new, hot MBAs. More than 50 U.S. medical schools include spirituality, moving away from old school, analytical, and information-based work and toward empathy, narrative medicine, and holistic care. While financial groups such as Lehman Brothers, Bear Stearns, Morgan Stanley, and JPMorgan Chase are contracting to Indian MBAs, left brain dominated portions of science are being balanced with a right brain emphasis. Clearly, society is calling out for a more creative, intuitive individual to lead us – and science, therefore has a changing role.

How do scientific beliefs form our world?
When our society believes a scientific idea we invent ways to sustain that idea. Society wants sustainable processes that can continue without doing harm. Therefore at this critical moment in history, as the human species embarks on globalization, it is valuable to study what we have historically allowed to be sustained by our scientific beliefs, and decide on possibilities for the future.

The need for an integrated approach.
Science can support society with a balanced approach to our stewardship of Earth. It can help us to create processes that will continue without hurting nature. But if we are to successfully to achieve science literacy that includes sustainability, our lessons must reach across the curriculum – and they must be deeply experiential. We must show examples that integrate biology with physics, chemistry, earth science, astronomy, sociology, history, literature, and even psychology.

The need for science literacy to come from actual experience.
Through numerous ‘hands-on’ scientific demonstrations, this course will examine the process by which science has shaped the meaning of the place of humans in nature. The main objective is for students to come away with an ability to distinguish between processes that are sustainable and ones that must eventually cause a problem. Emphasis is placed on experiential learning; students will actually simulate important historical scientific experiments before discussing philosophical implications of them. The chronology spans ancient teachings (~5,000 B.C.) to Quantum Physics, with grounding references to the evolution of consciousness in pre-recorded history. In order to gain an integrated view of major changes in human consciousness, readings will include the works of the great scientists and thinkers that are sometimes considered to be outside the realm of science. These include: Homer, Shakespeare, DesCartes, Jefferson, Emerson, Tolstoy, Goethe, and Melville. Topics include Quantum Physics, Einstein’s Relativity, Faraday’s Field, Darwin’s Evolution, Newton’s Bucket, Galileo’s Pendulum, and a comparison of the modern, Copernican, Ptolemaic, and Aristotelian views of the world. Attention is given to relationships across science and sociology. In particular, students will note significant areas where psychology, medicine, literature, biology, chemistry, and physics interrelate when they pertain to the human being.

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Conceptual Overview

This course is a tour of the sustainability of various scientific processes in the recorded period of the history of humankind. Careful projections will be made as to the activities from the time periods before recorded history and into the future. We will interweave three distinct strands simultaneously by: tracing sociological implications of innovations and inventions to their origins, highlighting scientist biographies, and simulating key original experiments.

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Course Objectives

The goals of this course are:

  • to recognize sustainability in all of its forms;
  • to introduce scientists through biography & ‘hands-on’ scientific demonstrations;
  • to experience the actual phenomena by performing simulations of key historical experiments, discussing the reaction and proaction of society to them.

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Guiding Questions

You will be asked to critically think through some of the big questions of our time.

  • When is a process sustainable?
  • How does sustainability apply to: science, psychology, sociology, philosophy, and anthropology.
  • How has the question, “What is matter made of?”, evolved throughout history.
  • How is one life like the life of collective humanity?
  • Does humankind have a group consciousness similar to creatures like the bees?
  • Why do great discoveries get lost and forgotten?
  • Is there synchronicity in scientific discoveries?
  • If innovation is accelerating, is there a speed limit?
  • When did humankind stop living in a sustainable way – and why?
  • What controls biology – chemicals or intention?
  • What has a greater impact on natures’ cycles – physical reality or beliefs?

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High Level Topic Outline

UNIT I

  • Sustainable Science: Part I
  • Wholeness of Nature
  • Ancient Astronomy to Present Science

UNIT II

  • BioPhysics and Genetics
  • Fields and Philosophy
  • ElectroMagnetism and Great Scientists

UNIT III

  • BioChemistry: Aristotle to BioTechnology
  • Earth Science: Nature’s Cycles
  • Thermal Trends and Stewardship

UNIT IV

  • Color, Waves, and Perception
  • Relativity, Quantum, and Child Intuition
  • Sustainable Science: Part II

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Chronology

THE ANCIENTS…

  • Definition of Science vs. Technology
  • India, Egypt, Islam, & China
  • Mathematics
  • Astronomy
  • Technology
  • Greco-Roman Culture
  • Pre-Socratics, Pythagorists, & Atomists
  • Greek Science: Platonism and Aristotelianism
  • Medicine
  • Engineering
  • The Middle Ages: Christian & Islamic Science
  • Physics
    ***
  • Pyramid
  • Magnet
  • Compass
  • Abacus
  • Odometer
  • Astrolabe
  • Sun Dial
  • Lever
  • Wheel
  • Inclined Plane
  • Acids, Bases & Salts
  • Trebuchet
  • Parabolic Motion

THE 16TH & 17TH CENTURIES…

  • The Renaissance and Copernicus
  • Copernicus, Brahe, and Kepler
  • Galileo and the Church
  • Experimental Science
  • Science and the Relation to Technology
  • Descartes, Pascal, and Newton
  • Mechanical and Mathematical Models
  • Newtonian Physics
    ***
  • Pendulum
  • Clock
  • Telescope
  • Vacuum Tube
  • Mass
  • Velocity
  • Momentum
  • Acceleration

THE 18TH CENTURY…

  • Newton’s Effect on Science & Society
  • The Early Industrial Revolution
  • Steam Power & Machines
  • Psychology
  • The Birth of Chemistry, Geology, & Biology
  • Darwin
    ***
  • Geared Machines
  • Steam Engine
  • Railroads
  • The Mind
  • Phylogeny

THE 19TH CENTURY…

  • Industrialization and European Expansion
  • Darwin & Evolution
  • Faraday & Field Theory
  • The Birth of Electromagnetic Devices
  • Universal Lighting
  • Aviation
  • Automation
  • What is Human Progress?
    ***
  • Chemical Battery
  • Generator
  • Electric Motor
  • Transformer
  • Airplane
  • Automaton
  • Mass Production

THE 20TH & 21ST CENTURIES…

  • Outer Space & Inner Consciousness
  • Genetic Engineering & Epigentics
  • Albert Einstein, New Physics, & The Bomb
  • The Uncertainty Principle
  • The Age of the Smart Machines
  • The Internet
  • Science, Technology, and Biotechnology
  • Conclusion and Review
    ***
  • Rocket
  • DNA
  • Fission
  • Photoelectric
  • Computer
  • Network
  • Virtual Reality
  • AI
  • Matter Responding to Consciousness

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Detail Outline

UNIT I

  • Sustainable Science: Part I Science Seeks Truth
  • Observation versus Analysis
  • Observing the Moon
  • The Nature of Science
  • Newton’s Bucket
  • Quantum Physics I
    • UNCERTAINTY
    • CO-LOCATION
    • ENTANGLEMENT
    • LIGHT THEORY
    • Pythagoreans (550 BC)
    • Empedocles (450 BC)
    • Plato (400 BC)
    • Euclid (300 BC)
    • Newton (1700 AD)
    • Huygens (1700 AD)
    • Young (1801)
    • Maxwell (1862)
    • Hertz (1887)
    • Einstein (1905)
  • Wholeness of Nature Holograms
    • The Golden Ratio
    • Mach & Einstein
    • INFINITY & ETERNITY
    • AS ABOVE, SO BELOW
    • THE HIVE MIND
    • The Lives of a Cell by Lewis Thomas, 1974.
    • FIBONACCI … FIBONACCI’S NUMBERS
    • KANT … Science is circular, answering its own questions.
    • QUANTITATIVE VS. QUALITATIVE
    • GALILEO & NEWTON
    • FARADAY & MAXWELL
    • The Wholeness of Nature by Henri Bortoft, physics, Oxford.
    • Analysis, Observation, & Imagination
    • Goethe: thinking as perception – observation as thinking.
    • Aristotle: knowledge of opposites is one.
    • Sufi poet Jalaluddin Rumi
    • Logical versus Holistic
    • The language of the intuitive mind
    • Being & Knowing
    • Developing a Theory
    • Ralph Waldo Emerson … ideas may create matter
  • Ancient Science to Present
    • Ancient Astronomy & Ancient Science
      • Ancient Africa: The Kushites
      • Ancient India: Zero and Calculus
      • Ancient China: The Big Four
      • Ancient South America: The Olmecs
      • Ancient Mesopotamia: The Babylonians
      • The Greeks, Sumerians, Andeans, Mayans, & Egyptians
      • World Views: Ptolemy to Copernicus to Galileo
    • Present Science
      • Newton’s Bucket
      • Quantum Effect
      • Consciousness as Agent

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UNIT II

  • BioPhysics
    • The Wisdom of Your Cells by Bruce H. Lipton, Ph.D.
    • Epigenetics
    • Cell’s Life<Protein Movement<DNA<RNA<Thought
    • The Complexity of Wholeness
    • Perception & Survival
    • Programming & Perception
    • The Future of Human Evolution
  • Fields
    • Fields & Philosophy
      • Centralized Force vs Distributed Force
      • Central Processor vs Network
      • Brain vs Body
      • Commander vs Hive Mind
      • Matter vs Field
      • Physical vs Non-Physical
    • Electrostatic Fields
    • Magnetic Fields
    • ElectroMagnetic Fields
  • Electromagnetism
    • Great Scientists
      • Franklin 1706-1790, USA, Static Electricity
      • Galvani 1737-1798, Italy, Galvanoscope
      • Volta 1745-1827, Italy, Battery
      • Goethe 1749-1832, Germany, Matter as Field
      • Ampere 1775-1836, France, Current
      • Oersted 1777-1851, Denmark, Electromagnetism
      • Ohm 1789-1854, Germany, E = I * R
      • Faraday 1791-1867, England, BIG 3, Field
      • Maxwell 1831-1879, England, Field Equations
      • Edison 1847-1931, USA , DC, Light Bulb
      • Tesla 1856-1943, Croatia/USA, AC, Resonance
      • Hertz 1857-1894, Germany, Frequency
      • Marconi 1874-1937, Italy/England, Radio
    • Electric Current
    • Ohm’s Law
    • Resistance
    • Electric Power

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UNIT III

  • BioChemistry
    • Biology vs Chemistry
    • The Branches of Chemistry
      • Organic Chemistry
      • Inorganic Chemistry
      • Biological Chemistry
      • Physical Chemistry
      • Analytical Chemistry
    • Aristotle’s Four Kingdoms
      • MINERAL
      • VEGETABLE
      • ANIMAL
      • MAN
    • Aristotle’s Four Elements
      • EARTH
      • WATER
      • AIR
      • FIRE
    • The Four Foods
      •  MINERAL
      • CARBOHYDRATE
      • PROTEIN
      • FATS & OILS
  • Earth Science: Nature’s Cycles
    • The Hydrosphere
    • The Carbon Cycle
    • The Role of Experimentation
      • HISTORICAL MODEL
      • PRESENT MODEL
      • A POSSIBLE FUTURE MODEL
    • The Calcium Cycle
    • Collecting CO2, O2, & H2
    • The Photosynthesis Cycle
    • Other Cycles
  • Thermal Trends
    • The SUN & Water
    • Heat Transfer & The Greenhouse Effect
    • Phase Changes
      • Evaporation
      • Condensation: Rain, Dew, Relative Humidity, Fog, Cloud
      • Steam
      • Ice
      • Sublimation
      • Regelation
      • Heat of Fusion and Heat of Vaporization
    • Thermodynamics
      • 1st & 2nd Laws of Thermodynamics
      • Adiabatic Weather – Upper Atmospheric Phenomena
      • Temperature Inversion
      • Entropy: Is there a one way street in Nature?

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UNIT IV

  • Color, Waves, & Perception
    • The Nature of Wave Phenomena
    • Sound Waves
    • Music
    • The Nature of Light
      • Photons & Waves
      • Astronomy
      • The Eye
    • The Nature of Color
      • Lightening Primaries
      • Darkening Primaries
      • After Image
      • The Sunset and The Sky
      • Newton’s vs Goethe’s Theory of Color
      • Complementaries
      • The Colors of Shadows
      • Subjective Effects of Color Immersion/Observation
  • Relativity
    • The Importance of Relativity in the 21st Century
      • The History of Relativity
      • Newton’s Theory of Gravity – 1687
      • Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity – 1905
      • General Theory of Relativity – 1916
      • Comparison of Newtonian vs. Einsteinian
      • Speed of light
      • Maxwell
      • Speed of Gravity waves
      • Equivalence Principle
      • GRAVITY – MOTION – CURVATURE OF SPACE
      • The Basics of Relativity
        • space not empty
        • space filled with structure
        • structure is “spacetime”
      • The Tests of Relativity
        • Starlight Deflection from the Sun
        • Mercury’s Perihelion Precession
        • Gravitational Redshift
        • Gravity Probe B Gyroscopes
    • e = mc2
  • Sustainable Science: Part II
    • The Major Sciences
    • The Nature of Science
    • Quantum Physics II
      • Concept: Quantum Theory
      • Quantum Exp #1: Photoelectric Effect
      • Quantum Exp #2: Millikan Oil Drop
      • Quantum Exp #3: Young’s Double Slit
      • Quantum Exp #4: de Broglie’s Wavelength
      • Quantum Exp #5: Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle
      • Concept: Complementarity
      • Concept: Schrodinger’s Wave Equation

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APPENDIX

REMEMBER MATE® Quizzes
Masters of Transformation
Great Scientists
High Tech Favorites
Low Tech Greatest Hits of All Time
Dimensional Analysis Introductory Problems #1a
Introductory Problems #1b
Introductory Problems #2
Student Written Problems #1
Student Written Problems #2
Student Written Problems #3
Student Written Problems #4
Student Written Problems #5
Student Written Problems #6
Student Written Problems #7
Da Vinci & Plato
Fermi Problems
A Gazillion
Little & Larger
Speed
Fastest Speeds
Triangulation
Estimation The Rules
Easy Practice
Advanced Practice
Significant Figures
Which Doesn’t Belong & Why General Knowledge
Observation & Analysis
Astronomy
Who Am I’s?

Bibliography

REMEMBER MATE® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF JOHN BICKART.

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